It’s not the blogging you're scared of.

It’s the cursor, the blank page, hitting publish.

Of a nasty comment or an undetected typo (I’m flipping terrified of those bad boys).

But believe me, it’s not the blogging you're scared of.
Ghost

Maybe you don’t feel scared. Maybe you just can’t think of anything to write, maybe the words won’t flow, maybe you can’t find the time. But these are all tell-tale symptoms.

If you’re stuck for words, running out of time, or lost for topic ideas you’ve probably got blog-phobia. Because if blogging was something you enjoyed, that lit you up, that you looked forward to doing, you wouldn’t be having those problems.

Now for the cure.

Think about what’s the worst that can happen.

If I publish this blog post, what’s the worst that can happen?

If someone spots a typo, what’s the worst that can happen?

If this post goes viral, and I suddenly become unimaginably famous (because success can be just scary as failure), what’s the worst that can happen?

Bet you haven’t found anything too terrifying yet, have you?
Spider
What’s the alternative?

Not writing the blog post. Staying quiet. Keeping your knowledge, gifts and experience to yourself. Now, what’s the worst that can happen?

Your business doesn’t grow. The people you serve can’t access the value you have to offer. You beat yourself up for not doing something you feel you should be doing. These all sound like pretty crappy outcomes to me.

Believe me, I feel the fear of blogging. The fear of someone calling me out, telling me I’m don’t know what I’m doing. But not blogging would be worse than any worst-case-scenario I could dream up. Not blogging would break the relationship I have with the entrepreneurs who may call on my services. I want to raise the standard of online communication, help small businesses connect with their ideal clients and pack personality into their websites. I can’t do that by staying quiet.

So yes, as I hit publish, I’m scared. But I’m overcoming my fear and doing it anyway.

Stay focussed on your blogging goal and all ‘what ifs’ will become acceptable risks.

Pumpkin